LI Addiction Resources - The Importance of Therapy after Treatment
Long Island Addiction Resources Prevention Resources Missing the Mark in Long Island
Prevention Resources Missing the Mark in Long Island
July 25, 2017
Long Island Addiction Resources Fighting Back: Responding to A Loved One’s Addiction 2
Fighting Back: Responding to A Loved One’s Addiction
August 8, 2017
Show all

Do I Really Need to Continue Therapy after Treatment?

Long Island Addiction Resources Do I Really Need to Continue Therapy after Treatment?

Hands - Counselling and Support

Each one of us comes to addiction through different circumstances. If we’re lucky enough and willing to give ourselves to the treatment process, we can make some real and significant breakthroughs that shed light on the root causes of our substance abuse and the reasons it escalated for so long. This is, by no means however, the end of our therapeutic journey. Even those of us who enter inpatient care often find ourselves in need of far deeper analysis and examination. As much progress as we may make during our treatment program, we’re really only beginning the work we need to do to achieve balanced mental health in our everyday lives.

Identifying the origins of our substance abuse must be accompanies by plans to address and manage these factors in our everyday lives. Whether it’s our relationships with our families, toxic and dysfunctional associations, underlying anxiety or depression issues or any other aggravating factor, it does us little good to know what triggers our urge to use without having means in place to manage them or avoid them. Therapy helps us to unravel the underlying mental health issues that either cause or are caused by our substance abuse. It is a critical part of the recovery process that helps us move forward in all other aspects of our lives.

We should not endeavor to put a timetable on our therapy. There may, in fact, come a time when we don’t feel the need to spend as much time in therapy as we did when we first completed our recovery, but we shouldn’t rush the process. It also helps to work with a therapist who is trained in addiction and who understands the behavioral pathology of our illness. Part of recovery is doing the necessary work to make sure we stay on track, and ongoing therapy is an integral part of this equation.

Comments are closed.